HISTORIC PRESERVATION:

http://questeverything.blogspot.com/2009/02/happy-birthday-fred-spot.html

2016 Addendum—
Hisotric Preservation is critical to the future well-being of Fredericksburg. Enhancing our efforts in historic preservation not only positively affects our quality of life but both economic development and tourism as well. As the region grows so does the importance of preserving Fredericksburg’s unique historic character.

The highlight of this last term was the hiring of a staff preservationist. However, as with the Historic Preservation Plan adopted in 2010, just hiring a new staffer or passing a plan do not by themselves mean we have achieved our preservation goals. The loss of a number of historic buildings over the past few years is testament to that. To achieve our preservation goals we need to ensure that preservation is a priority in all city departments. That every decision includes the question—How does this action impact city preservation goals?” We are not there yet but we have taken some positive steps. Over the next year we need to work with our new preservationist, assisted by the National Park Service, the UMW Preservation Dept, Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, to work out how to best implement our preservation goals.
And as in 2012, we need to again try to put a preservation committee together to oversee the implementation of our goals and report to the city every year on how much progress has, or has not been made.

2012–
“As we consider the future development of our communities we must keep three simple truths in the fore front of our deliberations. That these parks are both unique and irreplaceable. That people do not travel from across the country or from around the world to visit a retail store. That the average positive impact of a retail development is around fifteen years while the positive economic impact of these battlefields (and other historic sites) will last for generations as long as we continue to protect them.”

In addition to the battlefield the city has a historic downtown and numerous historic sites and buildings for which the above statement would apply.

  • Move forward with the recommendations of the Preservation Plan
  • Revisit establishing a preservation advisory committee with the National Park Service, HFFI and the UMW Preservation Dept. and residents to assist the city in meeting preservation goals.
  • Work on interpretive programs to make our historic site more tourists friendly.

The Issues

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT:
Too often we are hearing from those in City Hall that they are doing what is required to inform the public. {more…}

THE END TO BUSINESS AS USUAL:
No matter the adversity there are always opportunities. While presenting significant challenges to local governments in providing levels of service expected by residents {more…}

TAXES: 
I cannot understand those who justify raising taxes because our tax rate is lower than other localities or those who opposes tax increases on the basis that taxes are too high. {more…}

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 
“Even before the recent economic crash it was evident the city needed to diversify its tax base. {more…}

HISTORIC PRESERVATION: 
“As we consider the future development of our communities we must keep three simple truths in the fore front of our deliberations…” {more…}

CONSERVATON: 
“You’re going to get a lot of people pushing to open that river up,” Kelly said. “ {more…}

TRANSPORTATION: 
“At the end of the day, what I want to be able to do is say, alright, [GWRC], if you want to take care of transportation, these are the projects you’re going to need, this is how much it’s going to cost, this is how much we’re going to get from the state…{more…}